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To turn the tolerance sheath after the wind

The eagerness to accuse immigrants and Muslims of being intolerant of slaves seems rather peculiar when one considers the kind of attitudes that still exist among so-called Norwegian ethnicists.




(THIS ARTICLE IS MACHINE TRANSLATED by Google from Norwegian)

The eagerness to accuse immigrants and Muslims of being intolerant of slaves seems rather peculiar when one considers the kind of attitudes that still exist among so-called Norwegian ethnicists.

"Can we get in touch with a gay Muslim? One who dares not come out of the closet for fear of reactions from other Muslims? ”This story has been under pressure many times before. Yet this is almost literally the same request we get from almost all journalists who approach us in Skeiv Verden.

One journalist even wanted us to find two gay Muslim men who would hold hands on Greenland to provoke reactions. Although they lacked volunteers to take on the task, the conclusion seemed in place before the case was nearing pressure: Immigrants, preferably Muslims, pose a threat to gays.

This is a marketable story that Norwegians like to read – at least the journalists believe it, and maybe they are right. People like to get confirmed the performances they already have. If you read news stories about Muslims and homosexuality, it is no wonder that this notion prevails. If it is true that many Muslims have negative attitudes towards gays – are they alone about this in Norway?

It is not just Norwegian journalists who dispute such an angle. The case I am referring to was inspired by a news item in Denmark with the following headline: "I do not hold my girlfriend in the hand at Nørrebro." »Than anywhere else in town.

According to Fahad Saeed who was quoted, the whole case was based on misunderstandings – he actually said the opposite of the journalist: that he would like to hold his girlfriend in Nørrebro's hand. Still, the headline ended up being as it was, probably as a result of an urge to angle the case to fit into a notion of Nørrebro's population as threatening homophobes. This is a narrative we know very well here at home: Homophobia is due to intolerant immigrants, often with a Muslim identity.

Not necessarily wrong. The story of the gay Muslim struggling with acceptance in "own" environments is not true. The problem is that it also does not represent a complete truth.

Some struggle with acceptance in parts of the Muslim community, and some do not. There are many different stories and experiences among Separate Muslims, and there are many different attitudes among non-Separate Muslims. But the salable story of the gay Muslim struggling with acceptance among his own has become the Truth with great S. In that view, there is a stark contrast between "them" and "us". They – the Muslims – are intolerant and old-fashioned unlike us – the Norwegians – who are tolerant and progressive. The distance between an identity as a Muslim and an identity as a Norwegian becomes great, and the media's lack of imagination in the production of disjointed Muslims helps confirm this distance.

Norwegian tolerance. Yes, there is a lot of tolerance in Norway, and opportunities to live a full life as a queer, but there is also intolerance among so-called Norwegian ethnicists. For example, we have an integration minister who, in a fiery speech, told how proud she was that her party voted against common marriage law. She emphasized that marriage was created for the man and the woman. Not so unlike her new colleague, Justice Minister Per-Willy Amundsen, who said that gays kidnap heterosexual marriage. The response Sylvi Listhaug received at the speech – and similar statements from her party mates – suggests that she is in no way alone about these values. The speech is filmed, so we hear how in a few minutes she reveals her negative view of immigrants, Muslims and gays. This was true before she became minister, but she has not regretted the statements afterwards.

The intolerance of Norwegians is derived with the demand that immigrants should tolerate gays.

When asked what kind of special responsibility she as Minister of Integration has for attitudes that are communicated about gays, she replies: "Gays with immigrant backgrounds are very difficult, and it is important to stand up for their opportunity to take advantage of the freedom we have in Norway to love who we want. "

This is a freedom Listhaug has not fought for, but on the contrary actively worked towards. Her party colleague Minister for Children and Gender Equality Solveig Horne this summer urged immigrants to join the parade. The intolerance of Norwegians is derived with the demand that immigrants should tolerate gays. Special requirements are set for tolerance from immigrants – from which the ministers themselves are exempted.

Over Simplification. I definitely do not get a warm feeling inside of Sylvi Listhaug's sympathy with us poor gay immigrants. She will stand up for our opportunity to live freely only to hammer immigrants in the head that they are not tolerant enough. De does not stand for our values. It does vi in FrP – very suddenly. Sylvi: 1 – Immigrants: 0.

Blaming Islam and Muslims is double moral. It overshadows the actual image.

When journalists contact us, I often suggest a different angle. Most people then lose interest, only a few say yes.

"Homo" is still a common term used in Norwegian schools; every sixth man states that he will not sit next to gays on the bus; and we have ministers who have openly expressed their views on gays. If journalists had dared to challenge the usual angle, it might have been easier to see that attitudes toward gays still consist of mixed drops, including among so-called Norwegian ethnicists.

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