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Anders Dunk

Philosopher. Regular literary critic in Ny Tid. Translator.

An anarchic natural diversity

PORTRAIT in 100: Paul Feyerabend has often been portrayed as science's greatest critic, even its enemy, a cognitive anarchist who constantly attacked rationality. It is 100 years since the rabulist was born. Feyerabend gave us a new image of science as imperfect and impossible to perfect in a rigorous method. And in the extension of Feyerabend's arguments, Arne Næss thought there was every reason to be careful about intervening in foreign cultures – just as we should also be careful about intervening in soil or other ecosystems.

Old new in new packaging

MEMORIES: Nostalgia has been made into a commercial product that makes the past a constant and pressing presence. Do we really belong in a past tense? Memories are today produced, preserved and managed by commercial actors, by cultural products – which, to say it with Marx, are fetishized. Pop cultural products of the past are recycled, made into collectibles and picture books for the coffee table, sold as retro designs.

The iguaca parrots no longer sing

THE CLIMATE CRISIS: This book makes all other climate literature seem dangerously anthropocentric. We obviously haven't been very good at monitoring the earthly paradise.

Afropessimism, Afrofuturism and Afropolitanism

AFRICA: Disruption opens up for the capitalists a new display of power and new income: People, society and nature are reduced to raw material. The author Achille Mbembe's horizon is always the widest possible – the cosmic, earth-historical and planetary. Africa, despite all harrowing problems, is being called forth as a vibrant world center that still has powers in reserve, a teeming wildlife and a wealth of cultures.

"Agriculture leaves deserts everywhere" DECLINE: The

NEDVEKST: The Japanese re-reading of Marx advocates green communism or degrowth. The historical overview is impressive, and the analyzes are inspiring. Will a socialist or communist society necessarily be better, ecologically speaking? And should use value now come into play instead of exchange value?

Pragmatic utopianism

ENVIRONMENT: Among those who recognize the climate and nature crisis, the narratives that tie the damage of the past and the solutions of the future together are very different. 'Hammer's little green' invites debate and discussion.

Russian roulette with…

NUCLEAR WEAPONS: The experts say the danger of nuclear war has never been greater than right now. The danger of accidents, nuclear weapons going astray, cyber infiltration and misunderstandings has increased. Here comes a deep dialogue with the nuclear weapons philosophy, where intellectuals have tried to get a grip on the incomprehensible: the threat of the annihilation of the world. And what does Sergej A. Karaganov, foreign policy and military strategic adviser to Putin's government, say? Is the only thing we can do is to postpone the apocalypse, to avert it again and again?

Annually, around half a million people die in heat waves

GLOBAL WARMING: Just as tourists travel from Spain to Bergen to cool off, the whole world is fleeing towards cool refuges, while global warming shows itself as a bodily and concrete experience.

A seasick pirate on spaceship Earth

ECOLOGY: In this story, life on the sailboat becomes a microcosm. Tourists' life in the south disturbs the wildlife – while underwater life has been lost due to overfishing, erosion is increasing due to lost kelp forests. Is it possible to understand that the world that supports the body and consciousness is nature itself?