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Touch, bubbles and buns for dementia

It Is Not Over Yet
Regissør: Louise Detlefsen
(Danmark)

DEMENS: Nurse May Bjerre Eiby has developed a new treatment method for the elderly with dementia, with a belief in "hug and cake".

(THIS ARTICLE IS ONLY MACHINE TRANSLATED by Google from Norwegian)

It Is Not Over Yet is a touching documentary that will change our view of ourselves and our humanity. Louise Detlefsen has filmed life at a nursing home in Dagmarsminde in Denmark, where people with dementia are treated with compassion and seem to live a pleasant life.

Detlefsen challenges our perception of dementia and offers a completely new perspective on the last phase of life. Most of all, she reminds us that even though we know a lot about growing up, we know little about growing old.

Dignity

As the average age increases, we also have a stronger need to gain more control over the very last phase of life. The Swiss organization Dignitas, which "advocates for improved care and choice in life and at the end of life" and became known through Michel Houellebecq's novel The map and the terrain (The Map and the Territory, 2010), offers a radical way to gain control over life (or rather death).

A certainty that death is near, and not least exactly when it comes, may in itself be something one prefers rather than living with the uncertainty of what awaits us in old age. In any case, the current debate about euthanasia and assisted suicide seems outdated, after covid-19 has reminded us that taking care of the elderly is a responsibility that rests on those who are left.

This applies to all of us, whether we have aging relatives or because we are worried
for our own future.

We have recognized that in many parts of the world, poor care and poor hygiene in nursing homes and nursing homes have made a rapid spread of covid-19 possible, which has caused many deaths among the oldest in our society.

"The right of the strongest" can admittedly be a driving force in the development of nature, but not in society. That we take care of the weakest, even the old, is what makes us human.

Better than at home

But how do we take care of the weakest and oldest in the best possible way? When you watch the movie, you realize that we know. . .

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Melita Zajc
Zajc is a media writer, researcher and film critic. She lives and works in Slovenia, Italy and Africa.

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