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internationally

International orientering in the present.

House occupation and grassroots anarchism

BERLIN: The 70s came back in Berlin in many ways, but with the opposite sign: Today's fight against brutal urban redevelopment and demolition of war-ruined residential buildings has today turned into a fight against gentrification and housing speculation.

Oslo – a gold-edged agreement for Israel

Because of the Oslo Accords, Israel has experienced an adventurous economic growth – at the expense of the Palestinians. Extensive corruption was also the sad result of the Oslo process.
The European Parliament

"Of course Europe must take responsibility"

THE GREEN EUROPE: "European Green Deal" is reminiscent of the first UN climate report 30 years ago, according to Margrete Auken in the European Parliament. "When it comes to the climate, we can't wait to come up with something smart. We must act now, ”she tells MODERN TIMES.
Charleroi

The city that was left in the fog of oblivion

City history / BELGIUM: Filmmaker Guy-Marc Hinant wants to save the hometown's reputation by digging out the forgotten stories that have been hidden in the mounds of the city's memories.

UN Security Council Resolution1325 – equally relevant today

COLOMBIA: Three years after the peace agreement between the government of Colombia and the FARC EP, the picture is not very encouraging. Nevertheless, both individual women and women's organizations dare to stand up and contribute to openness and improvement.

Aung San Suu Kyi's growth and international fall

MYANMAR: To describe Myanmar as a military dictatorship in 2019 is as provocative as to claim that the emperor goes without clothes.

A global labor market in motion

arbejder:Half a century ago, the first Filipino workers traveled across the globe to work at factories and hotels in Denmark and Norway, among others. Their journey provides insight into a global labor market in motion.

The Anarchist from Berlin

Anarchists: MODERN TIMES launches a series on anarchists internationally. First out is Ralf Landmesser in Berlin.
USA

Can the desire for peace win over American warlifers?

USA VS CHINA: The US foreign policy elite practices anti-Chinese rhetoric and has cut diplomacy in favor of demands.

"I'm driving talks between President Trump and Kim Jong-un"

KOREA: 12. In June, South Korean President Moon Jae-in was received by King Harald during the country's first official state visit to Norway. Moon talked about the devastating impact of "structural violence" the division of his country had on both North and South Korea, and about "positive peace".

China's selective memory

CELEBRATE WITH BISMAK: Doesn't the Chinese regime see the irony in paying tribute to the students who demonstrated in 1919 while continuing to crush any protest from today's students?

Guaidó or Maduro?

VENEZUELA: The United States and Europe, on the one hand. Russia, China and Cuba on the other – the whole world has chosen sides. What do the citizens themselves say?

Blue light for human rights

TURKEY: The Erdogan Government reaches a new human rights low target with the lifetime sentence requirement for 16 prominent civilian leadership figures.

The river as the life blood of the city

PHILIPPINES: A photo book shows us how the world looks to many. A garbage dump. A mockery of human dignity. A ruined ecosystem. Can the power of the photo assist us in the desire for change?
lions

Where white star lions came down from the sky

TRAVEL-ESSAY: The white lions in South Africa became known in the world press in the seventies. But the white man's "discovery" of the white lion has now led these animals to the brink of extinction.
Letizia battaglia

Mafia power

Ny Tid met the Italian photographer Letizia Battaglia during the Berlinale for a conversation about her photographic work and the Italian mafia today.

Sweden one step closer to NATO membership

NATO CRUSH:The dust from NATO's Trident Juncture drill has barely stopped before the Northern Wind military exercise is held in Sweden. Frustrated Swedish peace workers see the exercise as another step towards enrolling in NATO.

Get the Defense home!

Party leader Bjørnar Moxnes emphasizes to Ny Tid why Rødt has four new proposals to the Storting this month. Red wants to reverse the authorities' eagerness to take part in wars of aggression.
Parivartan Sharma / Reuters

Trouble in the top too

The corruption index shows that robust democratic institutions limit the level of corruption in the public sector.
Photo: NTB Scanpix

Is peace in the Central African Republic?

The parties to the conflict in the Central African Republic have signed a peace agreement. It is not the first time warring parties in the country have done just that, and it is hardly the last.

Is a new Cold War coming?

Should we dig down, or should we find maps and compasses? asks the leader of Norway's Peace Team, Kari Anne Ness.

"Northern Wind" – an exercise on NATO's terms?

"As long as we are part of NATO, we must use our position to take a clear stance against armaments and war hoaxes," said Marianne Gulli of Red, who believes Norway should stay home under the Northern Wind.

The Moon – The New Suburb of Earth

Future optimism goes hand in hand with a critical look at humanity – at the Henie Onstad Art Center.

Will Spain be the first NATO country to support the nuclear ban?

Most of the countries in Europe do not support the UN nuclear ban. Will this change when Trump and Putin wreck the INF deal?
Misrata, Libya

The abused resolution and Norwegian embarrassment

The British Foreign Affairs Committee's report on the Libya war is overlooked in Norway: It explains that our allies on the ground were Libyan Islamists with ties to Al Qaeda.