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Real Sami powder

The Sami band Adjagas writes their own joics, wrapping them in music inspired by rock, country and reggae. Monday comes the debut album.

Blue in Oslo, Thursday 3 November: Siberian throat singer Albert Kuvezin and the band Yat-Kha make hefty versions of Led Zeppelin and Joy Division songs. During the concert, which was part of the Oslo World Music Festival, Kuvezin points out how his steppe song is reminiscent of the Sami joik, and it showed that he had lent an ear to the warmers of the evening. Because before Yat-Kha took the stage, the young joykers Lawra Somby and Sara Marielle Gaup in the Adjagas group had done their thing to show how joik can sound in 2005.

Adjagas tears the yoke apart from both the traditions and the modern connections to jazz and electronics we have become accustomed to. Instead, the band draws its inspiration from hard-hitting rock, low-key country and even reggae. The debut single "Mun Ja Mun", South Sámi from "I and I", takes its title from Jamaica, more specifically the Rastafarian "I and I" expression – which is used to show ties to both God, spirit traps and the outside world.

- "Mun Ja Mun" is not a Sami expression, but is directly translated. . .

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