A feeling in motion

Living off Landscape: or the Unthought-of in Reason
In his new book, French philosopher Francois Jullien maps both China's historical view of nature and landscape, and partly a philosophy of life as modern Chinese and we in the West can be inspired by.

(THIS ARTICLE IS ONLY MACHINE TRANSLATED by Google from Norwegian)

In connection with the Louisiana Museum of Art's major exhibition last year on new architecture and China, Chinese architect Wang Shu states that the landscape has always been the focal point of the Chinese view of life. At a time when China's explosive urbanization is eroding land and leaving traces of cheap concrete construction everywhere, Wang Shu counteracts this tabula-rasa idea by weighting the local, including recycling materials from old buildings that Chinese authorities systematically tear down in both land and city.

Wang Shu's studio, Amateur Architecture Studio, rethinks life and living form based on the Chinese understanding of landscape and nature. A system critical practice that emphasizes simple functionality over spectacular form, restoration over new construction, tradition over modernism. All of this goes back to an understanding of landscape and nature that has been dominant in China for centuries, but which, with the rapid urbanization of these years, is under pressure.

Landscape and human vision

In a new strong book, the French philosopher Francois Jullien maps partly China's historical view of nature and landscape, and partly a philosophy of life that modern Chinese and we in the West can be inspired by. In China, landscape and nature occupy a special position dating back to the year 1000. In Europe,. . .

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