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Engraving and secrecy

Grave journalism is a hot topic for the time being. The SKUP conference on investigative journalism, with 600 media people in Tønsberg as participants, was organized the same week as the Panama Papers was released in the media.

(THIS ARTICLE IS ONLY MACHINE TRANSLATED by Google from Norwegian)

Grave Journalism is a hot topic for the time being. The SKUP Conference on Investigative Journalism, with 600 media people in Tønsberg as participants, was organized the same week as the Panama Papers was released in the media. The University of Oslo also held a two-day seminar on the topic. And those who have seen the movie Spotlight, who is currently going to the cinema, knows what this is all about.
The Panama Papers were not dug up by journalists – it was a whistleblower who found them and leaked them to the press. An unknown "whistleblower" who hacked in and copied millions of files directly from the company Mossack Fonseca's hard drive. The recipient, the German Süddeutche Zeitung, received many other newspapers through the network of The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) – including the Guardian and Aftenposten – and in the coming months more will be dug.
But the question is what one. . .

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Truls Liehttp: /www.moderntimes.review/truls-lie
Editor-in-chief in MODERN TIMES. See previous articles by Lie i Le Monde diplomatique (2003–2013) and Morgenbladet (1993-2003) See also part video work by Lie here.

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