Pussy Riot: "We're All Pioneers"

Panel debate (video recording): Art and Censorship Panel (2015)

Should art have the goal of political change, and can censorship of art be turned into something groundbreaking? I am left with such reflections after watching a video from 16. December 2015, when the Art Gallery Art Net White Box in New York organized a panel debate on art and censorship in collaboration with the Dukley Art Center in Montenegro. The punk singer and activist Masha Alyokhina from Pussy Riot was among the panelists, and the occasion for the debate was the opening of the New Balkan Women's Museum's Museum in Montenegro, an international museum to be about, for and with women.

Aristotle believed that man was one son politician, a political being. The question many have asked is whether all art is necessarily political, whether art should always have political change as its goal – or its possible political consequences.

For many, the answer is an obvious yes, especially if the artist comes from a country characterized by censorship and persecution of vulnerable social groups. Activist artists can cause social change by putting international search and pressure on governing forces acting in violation of human rights, or by inspiring other actors to take the baton further.

In comic book form, censorship is often portrayed as an individual gagged with a handkerchief around his mouth (although most people who have tried know that it is possible to make a wide register of sounds gagged). What would the person have said if they had the opportunity, and why has anyone bothered to gag them? The gag itself often contributes to the interest in the artist's message becoming greater, an unwanted side effect. . .

Dear reader.
To continue reading, create a new free reader account with your email,
or logg inn if you have done it before. (click on forgotten password if you have not received it by email already).
Select if necessary Subscription (69kr)

Subscription NOK 195 quarter