Order the summer edition here

That's why they love the United States

Five years after 11. September is astonishing how little dislike the US is outside Europe.

(THIS ARTICLE IS ONLY MACHINE TRANSLATED by Google from Norwegian)

[Attitudes] "The reputation of the United States is deteriorating." This is how NTB's title and summary came out this summer, a message that went around media-Norway.

Ahead of the fifth anniversary of Al Qaeda's terrorist attack 11. In September, there are several incidents that challenge the global role of the United States: New Taliban offensive in Afghanistan, civil war-like development in Iraq, brutal assaults committed in Abu Ghraib and Guantanamo.

But at the same time, the clear speech shows that the United States' global reputation is not as bad as NTB and Norwegian media in general are. If you go behind the tabloid headlines and analyze what the earth's population really thinks about the United States and the world, one can find the background for a new worldview.

The NTB report above refers to a new survey made by the international institute Pew Research, which has interviewed 17.000 people in 15 countries. But the study actually shows that even in the era of the terror war, the United States is highly respected in Asia and Africa, which has the majority of the earth's population: On top comes Japan, which has 63 percent population with positive US outlook, followed by Nigeria with 52 percent, India with 56 percent and China with 47 percent US friendly.

These countries alone have 2,7 billion people. India – the world's largest democracy, affected by terrorism several times – has inhabitants with a somewhat non-European view of life: more than half now have faith in it. . .

Dear reader.
To continue reading, create a new free reader account with your email,
or logg inn if you have done it before. (click on forgotten password if you have not received it by email already).
Select if necessary Subscription (69kr)

avatar photos
Dag Herbjørnsrud
Former editor of MODERN TIMES. Now head of the Center for Global and Comparative History of Ideas.

You may also like