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African-American thinking and critical racial studies

RACE THEORY: In the United States, Republicans ban studies of racism. In Denmark, the Folketing has decided that the universities are «European». Viktor Orbán in Hungary had gender studies removed, and in Poland, social anthropology has become a favorite object of hatred. In Norway, the government sets up a commission due to fears of debate about "racist structures". The Norwegian public has copied this right-wing narrative from the United States – the notion that critical race theory, ie academic knowledge, should be a "societal problem". The background is an African-American intellectual heritage that began with the thinker Phillis Wheatley over 200 years ago.

In every human being's chest there is inserted a principle which we call 'love of liberty'; it does not tolerate oppression, and it yearns for fulfillment. "

With these words about the longing for freedom, the poet Phillis Wheatley (1753–1784) introduced a universal human rights thinking to the North Americans. . .

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Dag Herbjørnsrud
Former editor of MODERN TIMES. Now head of the Center for Global and Comparative History of Ideas.

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