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A trap of neutrality

Syria and the Neutrality Trap. The Dilemmas of Delivering Humanitarian Aid through Violent Regimes
Forfatter: Carsten Wieland I.B.
Forlag: Tauris, (Storbritannien)
SYRIA: Carsten Wieland uncovers a large number of mistakes in the Western donor countries' handling of the humanitarian crisis during the Syrian civil war. He also mentions how rebel forces have deliberately starved local people to attract aid: Ethiopia, Somalia, South Sudan, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Rwanda.

These are the noblest motives that come into play when the decision is made to provide humanitarian aid in a conflict zone or a bloody war. This is at least the case in principle, and for that reason it is an ultimate requirement that emergency aid must be neutral and therefore free from all political considerations and ulterior motives. However, it is not always that simple, and this calls for a number of difficult decisions in relation to Afghanistan.

"It is a well-established principle that emergency aid in conflict zones must be neutral.

The German journalist and diplomat Carsten Wieland has written a thought-provoking book in which he meticulously uncovers a large number of mistakes in the Western donor countries' handling of the humanitarian crisis during the Syrian civil war:

"There have been a number of cases in recent years where humanitarian aid has failed, and I would probably describe Syria as an extreme case," he said over a WhatsApp connection with MODERN TIMES from Berlin. "Dozens of mistakes were made in Syria, and therefore it is important that we use the Syrian example. . .

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Hans Henrik Fafner
Fafner is a regular critic in Ny Tid. Residing in Tel Aviv.

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