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Is there any reason to rejoice over the coronary vaccine?

Vaccine coercion in the shadow of the corona crisis
Forfatter: Trond Skaftnesmo
Forlag: Paradigmeskifte forlag (Norge)
COVID-19 / There is no real skepticism from the public sector about the coronary vaccine – vaccination is recommended, and the people are positive about the vaccine. But is the embrace of the vaccine based on an informed decision or a blind hope for a normal everyday life?

It's been many years since I smelled sweaty gyms and so nervous classmates lined up to be vaccinated with the BCG vaccine against tuberculosis. Where I lived, vaccine skepticism was not a major issue in the 70's. Show up, get vaccinated, done.

Anyone who today asks skeptical questions about new vaccines ends up in the same category as conspiracy theorists and people with foil hats who think the earth is flat and the moon landing a bluff. The trenches are bigger and deeper than ever, and few can stand on the sidelines with a gentle index finger in the air and ask: Is this safe?

Author, philosopher and anthropologist Trond Skaftnesmo dares to ask questions. He likes to examine views that contradict accepted truths and became unpopular with the book Enemies of the people (2012) about the three controversial researchers Andrew Wakefield, Olle Johansson and Arpad Pusztai.

Skaftnesmo: Vaccine coercionWith the book Vaccine coercion in the shadow of the corona crisis he sticks his questioning hand into another wasp nest, without hiding his underlying skepticism of the authorities and. . .

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Iril Kolle
Freelance journalist, translator and graphic designer.

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