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propaganda

Totalitarianism then and now

iDEOLOGY: By agreeing on a suitable 'enemy', a disintegrated society finds coherence, energy and meaning. A totalitarian propaganda has led to the conclusion that Ukraine will now be allowed to use F-16 jets against the nuclear power Russia – with the major consequences this may entail.

The caricature and the role of satire in information warfare

VISUALLY: Graphic satire has become a weapon. The first 'caricature war' arose between Protestants and Catholics. Caricature is about – also in Ukraine and Russia – increasing morale in one's own ranks by ridiculing the enemy with all possible means and stereotypes – and praising one's own side.

The cartoonists and the war

SATIRE: MODERN TIMES has spoken to seven Ukrainian and one Russian cartoonist, all associated with the Libex network, about how they view their work in relation to the war in Ukraine.

For those who want to understand this crisis

UKRAINE: MODERN TIMES' regular commentator, John Y. Jones, gives us here in this essay (via Jacques Baud) an overview of the balance of power, the progression of the Ukraine war, the propaganda threat, the Russians' intentions and Western reactions, the Nazi accusations and lies campaigns.

The power of 20 years of propaganda

911: How can it be that a man like Spike Lee believed so strongly that New York's Twin Towers and Building 7 were taken down with explosives that he wanted to spend the last 30 minutes of his documentary series exploring, if not defending, such a view?

2050: Earth is our wisest teacher

SCENARIO: Imagine, this is the year 2050, and we look back at the origin and evolution of the coronavirus pandemic over the past three decades: both the plagues of pandemics, flooded cities, burned forests, drought and other rising violent climate disasters. We offer the following scenario for such a prospect from the future.

The unifying force of a common struggle

activism: Movement is a lyrical and beautifully filmed piece of political propaganda – with a Moroccan twist.

Russian television

Russian citizens today have access to hundreds of TV channels, but still largely choose to follow only the largest state channel. Editor of Vedomosti, Maxim Trudolyubov, wonders why.

The Holberg debate: Essential falsehoods and immaterial truths

Why do ordinary journalists react so strongly to media criticism of the kind Assange and Pilger bring to square one? Dagbladet and Bergens Tidende were quick to call the two "conspiratorial".

Bought and paid war journalism

Large parts of the world's journalists receive financial benefits from adapting their reporting to American politics.

Propaganda and tears 

Vitalij Manskij gives us unique looks behind North Korea's facade – and what we see is truly a strange and terrible society.

30 years in the service of peace

Propaganda, manipulation and other psychological tools are invaluable in both war and foreign policy strategies.