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Harepus in Nazi land

Sonja Henie still creates a divide in the audience. And it's not easy to establish her reputation: Was she a heroine or a determined egoist?

(THIS ARTICLE IS ONLY MACHINE TRANSLATED by Google from Norwegian)

To make a long story short, we can say that the female ideal in the early 1900th century was not healthy: Corsets hampered freedom of movement and obstructed blood circulation, which exposed the ladies to a wide range of health problems which at the time went by the collective name chlorosis, or bleach. This ideal, however, was the ideal of the old upper class from which the new, newly rich bourgeoisie distanced itself. Thus, the stage was cleared for the "flapper": a young woman who behaved unfeminine. She could smoke, drive a car, dance to Negro music and play sports – all that a lady in spe should not do. Sonja Henie, daughter of former competition cyclist and later fur trader Wilhelm Henie,. . .

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Kjetil Korslund
Historian of ideas and critic.

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